Sully's Scoop 1/09

  • Monday, January 14, 2013

Q. When will the lights on the new Bowman Road overpass go on? And when will all the cones be gone? The article in the Dec. 12 paper says that the boulevard is now officially open, so I was so looking forward to driving on the overpass and having it be all lit up. I understand that the cones still need to be in place at some locations because of additional work, but again, I expected lots of them to be gone if it is officially open. - Gretchen Kaylor, Mount Pleasant A. “The lights will be activated once all of them are installed. SCE&G is responsible for the installation of the lights, and they are approximately 70 to 75 percent complete. As you may have noticed many of the barrels have been removed and they will continue to disappear once it is safe to do so. From time to time in the future it will be necessary for the contractor to close lanes of traffic for the protection of the work crews.” - J. E. (Ed) Barbee, CPPB, Transportation Construction Liaison Officer   Q. Why is there no stop light at the intersection of Frontage Road and Shellmore Boulevard? This intersection is as busy and dangerous as the Frontage Road intersections with Bowman and Anna Knapp. - Debbie Brown A. “During project development for the Johnnie Dodds Boulevard improvements, signal warrant analyses indicated the intersection did not meet the required threshold values for signalization.” - Brad Morrison, Director of Transportation, Town of Mount Pleasant   Q. When going from Rifle Range Road, on Bowman Road to any business between Bowman and Anna Knapp on the Crickentree Village side, one must cross Johnny Dodds Boulevard twice. There is no left turn on the frontage road from Bowman - though we have checked it and there are always enough gaps to do it easily. Any chance of a rethink on that one? - Jane Halford, Mount Pleasant A. “There were several studies done prior to making the decision to prohibit left turns from Bowman Road onto the frontage road. The left turn from Bowman Road into the frontage road (Crickentree Village side) was eliminated for safety reasons due to the proximity of the frontage road to the exit ramp from Johnnie Dodds Boulevard and the addition of another traffic lane. The safest route for access to businesses on the frontage road from Bowman Road will be to proceed to the traffic signal at Hospital Drive, turn left onto the frontage road and proceed to the new traffic signal at Anna Knapp, turn left and proceed on Anna Knapp across Johnnie Dodds and turn left onto the frontage road.” - J. E. (Ed) Barbee, CPPB, Transportation Construction Liaison Officer, Town of Mount Pleasant   Q. 1. Who decided planting trees on Mathis Ferry Road last year during the scorch of summer was a good idea?
2. If planting them at that point was so important - why weren’t they ever watered?
3. Why were water bags finally put on mostly dead shriveling trees?
4. Who finally determined they were dead, then ordered them hacked off above the old water bag and basically left as a trashy eyesore on the side of the road?
5. Where did all this money come from? - Coby Mozingo, Mount Pleasant A. “They were planted in late May and early into June 2011, which is in the later half of spring. This stretch of time had higher than normal temperatures which was unpredictable, with many days being 5-10 degrees warmer than normal.
2. They were watered, but mortality is a part of installations; however, it was much higher than expected in this project.
3. Bags were installed with the trees.
4. There were some complaints about the dead trees and when replaced it is intended to reuse the bags and staking.
5. Town funds were used for the above mentioned project.” - Eddie Bernard, RLA, LEED AP, ISA Certified Arborist Municipal Specialist, ISA Certified Tree Risk Assessor, Town of Mount Pleasant- Planning Department   Q. What is the meaning of these letters on the light poles on Pitt Street from the start to McCants Street? - Alison Dailey, Mount Pleasant A. “The North American electric system is comprised of three phases of Alternating Current (AC). They are commonly noted as “A Phase,” “B Phase” and “C Phase.” The ABC lettering you see on some SCE&G power poles designates the relative position of those phases at the top of the pole. It’s important that utilities know the relative phasing on each pole so that they can correctly match phasing when power needs to be provided from alternate sources during maintenance or emergencies. You will normally only see the lettering designation on poles where the system changes (from overhead to underground for example) or a tap splits off the main circuit.” - Matt Hammond, Manager, Mount Pleasant Electric Operations, SCE&G

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