Organic 101

  • Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Recent years have seen a significant rise in “organic” produce – defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as food that is grown and processed without using synthetic fertilizers or pesticides. But is organic produce really a healthier choice? In fact, a meta-analysis of 240 reports comparing organically and conventionally grown food, found that organic foods, due to lower chemical contamination, are safer for consumption than their conventionally grown counterparts. And it stands to reason that ingesting fewer toxins is healthier than the alternative.

Research has shown that conventional farming methods introduce toxins into your diet and body, which can cause health problems, and they destroy nutrients in foods by ruining soil quality. Excessive use of pesticide and herbicide contaminates ground water, ruins soil structures and promotes erosion. Growing produce in nutrient-depleted soil diminishes the nutritional content of the produce. Alternatively, organic farming methods pay close attention to maintaining and maximizing soil quality, thereby increasing the nutrient levels of the foods grown in it, making them healthier than conventionally grown foods.

The Environmental Working Group, a nonprofit organization working to protect human and environmental health, publishes the “Dirty Dozen Plus” and the “Clean 15,” based on years of independent research on chemical levels of produce. “The Dirty Dozen Plus” lists the conventionally grown produce that tests highest in levels of contamination from pesticides and other harmful chemicals. Green beans, kale and collard greens have been added to the list because of their likelihood of containing highly toxic organophosphate insecticides. Alternately, the “Clean 15” is the list of produce with the lowest pesticide content.

The Dirty Dozen: apples, celery, sweet bell peppers, peaches, strawberries, spinach, nectarines, grapes, lettuce, cucumbers, blueberries, potatoes, plus green beans, kale and collard greens.

The Clean 15: onions, sweet corn, pineapples, avocado, asparagus, sweet peas, mangoes, eggplant, domestic cantaloupe, kiwi, cabbage, watermelon, sweet potatoes, grapefruit, mushrooms.

So, how do you know if something is really organic? The easiest way to tell is by the USDA “certified organic” stamp on packaging and label stickers. Many small, local farmers are following strict organic practices yet do not exhibit the USDA organic stamp. Getting to know the producers of your food is another way to ensure you are buying organic. Educate yourself and watch for creative marketing ploys known as “greenwashing.” Greenwashing is a marketing tactic that uses consumer-tested colors, typeface and other visual cues, including pictures and graphics, to trick people into thinking products are organic. Companies have been found to abuse this tactic, using blatant false advertising containing words such as “100 percent organic,” “organic” or “made with organic ingredients,” but this practice was banned in the U.S. in October 2002.

Quick tips for healthy produce shopping:

– Buy from a local, organic farmer.

– Choose organic in your local grocery store when buying anything on the Dirty Dozen list.

– Save money by purchasing non-organic varieties of the Clean Fifteen.

– With spring here, visit your farmers market (make sure to ask about their growing practices).

– Stay informed by visiting the Environmental Working Group online.

EcoHealth Wellness Center and Detox Spa fuses Integrative Nutrition Programs with state-of-the-art wellness and detoxification services that meet the health needs of the whole person. They are professionals in preventative and functional medicine, nutrition and a host of complementary and alternative therapies. Their unmatched commitment to personal health as well as the health of the environment separates them from all other wellness centers. They only use all-natural, biodegradable, non-toxic materials in everything they do. They buy organic, local and recycle whenever possible. Your well-being – and the well-being of the planet – depends on it.

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