Proper watering to alleviate brown spots

  • Sunday, June 22, 2014

Leyland Cypress issues, roaches and rodents that like air conditioning, flies by the grill, how an application of SeaHume and 15-00-15 made the grass so green, mosquitoes and these mysterious brown areas in my yard seem to dominate my conversations this week.

The “mysterious brown areas” have in all cases turned out to be lack of water.

Money has been spent on fungicides and insecticides when all the area needed is a little water. If you have an irrigation system, check to make sure your heads are turning properly and all your zones (valves) are working, or hire a professional to go through your system.

“My irrigation system runs for 20 minutes per zone three times per week. Is that enough water?” This is a question I get asked frequently, and the answer is not a yes-or-no response. Different irrigation systems have different gallon-per-minute nozzles, so the rate varies according to the type of nozzle installed. Water pressure also varies depending on where you live and whether you have a well. Some irrigation heads pop up and mist and others pop up and spray in a rotary fashion. The difference is enormous to a yard. The pop-ups that are spraying a constant mist can flood an area very quickly. The rotary head can run for an hour without too much water being applied.

Ideally, your soil should be moist down to six inches. Moist – not saturated. A soil probe is an excellent way to determine the moisture levels in the soil. Soil probes are available at garden centers. Soil probes will allow you to check the moisture as well as the profile of your soil.

You can also determine how much thatch you have using these probes. Soil probes also make taking a soil test much easier.

Measuring the amount of water your sprinkler or irrigation system is putting onto your landscape is very easy. A few coffee cups that have an equal diameter on top as the bottom is all you need. If you are not a coffee person, you can also use tuna fish cans, soup cans or other containers that have an equal diameter on top and bottom. If you don't want to look like a hillbilly, you can invest in several rain gauges.

Simply place these throughout your lawn and run the sprinkler for 15 minutes, then measure the amount of water in the container.

If you have an irrigation system, you will have to measure each zone separately to get accurate measures. If you collected a quarter-inch of water in 15 minutes and you wanted to put out a half-inch of water, simply increase your irrigation time to 30 minutes.

By applying organic products and/or wetting agents, you can greatly reduce the amount of water you need to apply.

Cotton Burr compost is a great organic product that will reduce your watering bill and increase the soil's nutrient holding capacity, making your fertilizers more effective. Cotton Burr compost will also help reduce runoff of fertilizers and other control products into the environment because the products penetrate the soil.

Wetting agents allow water to penetrate deeper into the soil resulting in deeper rooting grasses, plants and trees. Wetting agents will also help reduce runoff of fertilizers and other control products into the environment because the products penetrate the soil.

Although water is very inexpensive here compared to other parts of the country and world, you still don't want to waste it.

Wetting agents have been shown to reduce water usage by 30-60 percent. Fungicide use can be reduced with less watering.

The most important aspect of watering is keeping the soil moist to a depth of six inches. Add the appropriate amount of water for your yard with your soil type, wind exposure, slope or yard, and exposure to sun.

Always read, understand and follow product label. The product label is a federal law.


Bill Lamson-Scribner can be reached during the week at Possum's Landscape and Pest Control Supply. Possum's has three locations: 481 Long Point Road in Mount Pleasant (843-971-9601), 3325 Business Circle in North Charleston (843-760-2600), or 606 Dupont Road in Charleston (843-766-1511). Bring your questions to a Possum's location, or visit us at www.possumsupply.com. You can also call in your questions to “The Garden Clinic,” Saturdays from noon to 1 p.m. on 1250 WTMA (The Big Talker). The Horticulture Hotline is available 24/7 at www.possumsupply.com.

Comments

Notice about comments:

Moultrie News is pleased to offer readers the enhanced ability to comment on stories. We expect our readers to engage in lively, yet civil discourse. We do not edit user submitted statements and we cannot promise that readers will not occasionally find offensive or inaccurate comments posted in the comments area. Responsibility for the statements posted lies with the person submitting the comment, not Moultrie News.

If you find a comment that is objectionable, please click "report abuse" and we will review it for possible removal. Please be reminded, however, that in accordance with our Terms of Use and federal law, we are under no obligation to remove any third party comments posted on our website. Read our full terms and conditions.

On Vacation

On Vacation Moscow

Thursday, September 4, 12:53 p.m.

Upcoming Events
Poll
 Latest News
Print Ads
Latest Videos


Moultrie News

© 2014 Moultrie News an Evening Post Industries company. All Rights Reserved.

Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service, Privacy Policy and Parental Consent Form.